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Romans 7:24 - Wretched Man That I Am Bookmark

The body serving as the seat of the death into which the soul is sunk through the power of sin. (Dr. Marvin R. Vincent, Vincent's Word Studies)

May we be enabled to shake off that lethargy which is so apt to creep upon us! For this end, a deep practical conviction of our natural depravity and weakness will be found of eminent advantage. (William Wilberforce)

Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death?  (NASB)

O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? (KJV)

Oh, what a miserable person I am! Who will free me from this life that is dominated by sin and death? (NLT)

Wretched man that I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? (NET)

Romans 7:24
O wretched man that I am (talaipōros egō anthrōpos). “Wretched man I.” Old adjective from tlaō, to bear, and pōros, a callus.  In N.T. only here and Revelation 3:17. “A heart-rending cry from the depths of despair” (Sanday and Headlam).  WORD PICTURES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT by Archibald Thomas Robertson

Revelation 3:17  You say, 'I am rich. I have everything I want. I don't need a thing!' And you don't realize that you are wretched and miserable and poor and blind and naked. (NLT)

Paul here has understood the full measure of that from which he has been delivered!  Who can know the vile depths of a reprobate heart.  His retort is that of total exasperation at this continuous revelation of his fleshly estate and the need for a Savior.

1Timothy 1:15  This is a trustworthy saying, and everyone should accept it: "Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners"—and I am the worst of them all. (NLT)

I used to think that I was the only person in the world that struggled in the faith!  But then somehow I was led to discover John Bunyan--a man whom Christ saved in the very act of suicide.  John's honest sharing of his struggle in the book, Grace Abounds to the Chief of Sinners, told me that I was not alone and, most importantly, that knowing Christ brings victory.  I have not discovered some sort of celestial bliss wherein all struggles cease.  Rather I have discovered how to struggle in the victory over sin that Christ delivers to all who would believe.  I have learned how to live, not under the law, but under His Grace, a place of perfect rest.  However, the struggle is important in our lives because now that we know Christ, it works to produce true humility.  It is truly a terrible thing to fall into the hands of the living God.  It is terrible because it strips us of all of the veils behind which we hide.  It is wonderful because it provides peace (not as the world gives) but the peace of knowing that our sins have been forgiven.  It is superior in that we are constantly reminded of the riches of Christ's glory into which we have been adopted as joint heirs.  It shakes us from our sleepful state and drags us from our slothfulness.  With each remembrance of our sin it expands our understanding of the length, breathed, and depth of the Savior's love.

It tends to produce humility. It is humbling to man to be thus under the influence of evil passions. It is degrading to his nature; a stain on his glory; and it tends to bring him into the dust, that he is under the control of such propensities, and so often gives indulgence to them. In such circumstances, the mind is overwhelmed with wretchedness, and instinctively sighs for relief. Can the Law aid? Can man aid? Can any native strength of conscience or of reason aid? In vain all these are tried, and the Christian then calmly and thankfully acquiesces in the consolations of the apostle, that aid can be obtained only through Jesus Christ. (Dr. Albert Barnes)

May we be enabled to shake off that lethargy which is so apt to creep upon us! For this end, a deep practical conviction of our natural depravity and weakness will be found of eminent advantage. As it is by this we must at first be roused from our fallacious security, so by this we must be kept wakeful and active unto the end. Let us therefore make it our business to have this doctrine firmly seated in our understandings, and radically worked into our hearts. With a view to the former of these objects, we should often seriously and attentively consider the firm grounds on which it rests. It is plainly made known to us by the light of nature, and irresistibly enforced on us by the dictates of our unassisted understandings. But lest there should be any so obstinately dull, as not to discern the force of the evidence suggested to our reason, and confirmed by all experience, or rather so heedless as not to notice it, the authoritative stamp of Revelation is superadded, as we have seen, to complete the proof; and we must therefore be altogether inexcusable, if we still remain unconvinced by such accumulated mass of argument. (William Wilberforce)

The body serving as the seat of the death into which the soul is sunk through the power of sin. (Dr. Marvin R. Vincent, Vincent's Word Studies)

May we be enabled to shake off that lethargy which is so apt to creep upon us! For this end, a deep practical conviction of our natural depravity and weakness will be found of eminent advantage. (William Wilberforce)

Wretched man that I am! Who will set me free from the body of this death?  (NASB)

O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? (KJV)

Oh, what a miserable person I am! Who will free me from this life that is dominated by sin and death? (NLT)

Wretched man that I am! Who will rescue me from this body of death? (NET)

Romans 7:24
O wretched man that I am (talaipōros egō anthrōpos). “Wretched man I.” Old adjective from tlaō, to bear, and pōros, a callus.  In N.T. only here and Revelation 3:17. “A heart-rending cry from the depths of despair” (Sanday and Headlam).  WORD PICTURES IN THE NEW TESTAMENT by Archibald Thomas Robertson

Revelation 3:17  You say, 'I am rich. I have everything I want. I don't need a thing!' And you don't realize that you are wretched and miserable and poor and blind and naked. (NLT)

Paul here has understood the full measure of that from which he has been delivered!  Who can know the vile depths of a reprobate heart.  His retort is that of total exasperation at this continuous revelation of his fleshly estate and the need for a Savior.

1Timothy 1:15  This is a trustworthy saying, and everyone should accept it: "Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners"—and I am the worst of them all. (NLT)

I used to think that I was the only person in the world that struggled in the faith!  But then somehow I was led to discover John Bunyan--a man whom Christ saved in the very act of suicide.  John's honest sharing of his struggle in the book, Grace Abounds to the Chief of Sinners, told me that I was not alone and, most importantly, that knowing Christ brings victory.  I have not discovered some sort of celestial bliss wherein all struggles cease.  Rather I have discovered how to struggle in the victory over sin that Christ delivers to all who would believe.  I have learned how to live, not under the law, but under His Grace, a place of perfect rest.  However, the struggle is important in our lives because now that we know Christ, it works to produce true humility.  It is truly a terrible thing to fall into the hands of the living God.  It is terrible because it strips us of all of the veils behind which we hide.  It is wonderful because it provides peace (not as the world gives) but the peace of knowing that our sins have been forgiven.  It is superior in that we are constantly reminded of the riches of Christ's glory into which we have been adopted as joint heirs.  It shakes us from our sleepful state and drags us from our slothfulness.  With each remembrance of our sin it expands our understanding of the length, breathed, and depth of the Savior's love.

It tends to produce humility. It is humbling to man to be thus under the influence of evil passions. It is degrading to his nature; a stain on his glory; and it tends to bring him into the dust, that he is under the control of such propensities, and so often gives indulgence to them. In such circumstances, the mind is overwhelmed with wretchedness, and instinctively sighs for relief. Can the Law aid? Can man aid? Can any native strength of conscience or of reason aid? In vain all these are tried, and the Christian then calmly and thankfully acquiesces in the consolations of the apostle, that aid can be obtained only through Jesus Christ. (Dr. Albert Barnes)

May we be enabled to shake off that lethargy which is so apt to creep upon us! For this end, a deep practical conviction of our natural depravity and weakness will be found of eminent advantage. As it is by this we must at first be roused from our fallacious security, so by this we must be kept wakeful and active unto the end. Let us therefore make it our business to have this doctrine firmly seated in our understandings, and radically worked into our hearts. With a view to the former of these objects, we should often seriously and attentively consider the firm grounds on which it rests. It is plainly made known to us by the light of nature, and irresistibly enforced on us by the dictates of our unassisted understandings. But lest there should be any so obstinately dull, as not to discern the force of the evidence suggested to our reason, and confirmed by all experience, or rather so heedless as not to notice it, the authoritative stamp of Revelation is superadded, as we have seen, to complete the proof; and we must therefore be altogether inexcusable, if we still remain unconvinced by such accumulated mass of argument. (William Wilberforce)



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