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The online magazine of the Christian Military Fellowship.

Romans 6:04 - The Gift of a New Life Bookmark

Rom 6:4 We are buried with him - Alluding to the ancient manner of baptizing by immersion.  That as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory - Glorious power.  Of the Father, so we also, by the same power, should rise again; and as he lives a new life in heaven, so we should walk in newness of life.  This, says the apostle, our very baptism represents to us. (John Wesley)
Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. (NASB)
Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. (KJV)
For we died and were buried with Christ by baptism. And just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glorious power of the Father, now we also may live new lives. (NLT)
Therefore we have been buried with him through baptism into death, in order that just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too may live a new life. (NET)
Speaking of the story of the fall from Genesis 3:
Yet the story also points out that there is no escaping divine accountability.  Those who try to be as God finally stand before God like children who have been found out and are full of evasions.  The author thus brings out the full absurdity of the Prometheus motif.  But he does so with insight into the tragic human situation in which it seems that there is immanent justification—in the desire for culture, the work of thought, and sensual longing—for human hostility to God and the attempt to break free from the divine prohibition.  The true reality of sin can be grasped only when one perceives that the divine likeness itself opens up the possibilities of deviation and the unfathomable distress which every act of deviation causes when it comes under the pitiless divine glance.  (Theological dictionary of the New Testament. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans.)

I suspect that we only begin to see the immense work of God in our redemption when we begin to see that from which we were liberated—the "pitiless divine glance!"  Here we begin to see that we were "buried together with" (Greek - sunthapto?) the Savior Himself so that we would be declared dead unto sin and its power.  If there could have been another way wouldn't the Father have chosen it rather than sacrifice His only begotten Son?  Our sin has far reaching and unknown (to us) consequences that can only be solved by the death of the sinner in order to quench the divine justice.  Therefore, our fellowship with Christ in His death becomes the gateway to a new life by being also included in His resurrection.  We are not left low in the grave but empowered by this fellowship to live lives for which heretofore we could only dream.  To walk (not only walk, but to walk at large - Greek: peripateo?) in a new life created especially for us and entered into by faith in Christ Jesus alone.

In newness of life - This is a Hebraism to denote new life. We should rise with Christ to a new life; and having been made dead to sin, as he was dead in the grave, so should we rise to a holy life, as he rose from the grave.  The argument in this verse is, therefore, drawn from the nature of the Christian profession.  By our very baptism, by our very profession, we have become dead to sin, as Christ became dead; and being devoted to him by that baptism, we are bound to rise, as he did, to a new life. (Dr. Albert Barnes)
Rom 6:4 We are buried with him - Alluding to the ancient manner of baptizing by immersion.  That as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory - Glorious power.  Of the Father, so we also, by the same power, should rise again; and as he lives a new life in heaven, so we should walk in newness of life.  This, says the apostle, our very baptism represents to us. (John Wesley)
Therefore we have been buried with Him through baptism into death, so that as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too might walk in newness of life. (NASB)
Therefore we are buried with him by baptism into death: that like as Christ was raised up from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. (KJV)
For we died and were buried with Christ by baptism. And just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glorious power of the Father, now we also may live new lives. (NLT)
Therefore we have been buried with him through baptism into death, in order that just as Christ was raised from the dead through the glory of the Father, so we too may live a new life. (NET)
Speaking of the story of the fall from Genesis 3:
Yet the story also points out that there is no escaping divine accountability.  Those who try to be as God finally stand before God like children who have been found out and are full of evasions.  The author thus brings out the full absurdity of the Prometheus motif.  But he does so with insight into the tragic human situation in which it seems that there is immanent justification—in the desire for culture, the work of thought, and sensual longing—for human hostility to God and the attempt to break free from the divine prohibition.  The true reality of sin can be grasped only when one perceives that the divine likeness itself opens up the possibilities of deviation and the unfathomable distress which every act of deviation causes when it comes under the pitiless divine glance.  (Theological dictionary of the New Testament. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans.)

I suspect that we only begin to see the immense work of God in our redemption when we begin to see that from which we were liberated—the "pitiless divine glance!"  Here we begin to see that we were "buried together with" (Greek - sunthapto?) the Savior Himself so that we would be declared dead unto sin and its power.  If there could have been another way wouldn't the Father have chosen it rather than sacrifice His only begotten Son?  Our sin has far reaching and unknown (to us) consequences that can only be solved by the death of the sinner in order to quench the divine justice.  Therefore, our fellowship with Christ in His death becomes the gateway to a new life by being also included in His resurrection.  We are not left low in the grave but empowered by this fellowship to live lives for which heretofore we could only dream.  To walk (not only walk, but to walk at large - Greek: peripateo?) in a new life created especially for us and entered into by faith in Christ Jesus alone.

In newness of life - This is a Hebraism to denote new life. We should rise with Christ to a new life; and having been made dead to sin, as he was dead in the grave, so should we rise to a holy life, as he rose from the grave.  The argument in this verse is, therefore, drawn from the nature of the Christian profession.  By our very baptism, by our very profession, we have become dead to sin, as Christ became dead; and being devoted to him by that baptism, we are bound to rise, as he did, to a new life. (Dr. Albert Barnes)


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