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The online magazine of the Christian Military Fellowship.

Romans 6:02 - Dead to Sin Bookmark

How shall we, that are dead to sin - The phraseology of this verse is common among Hebrews, Greeks, and Latins.  To Die to a thing or person, is to have nothing to do with it or him; to be totally separated from them: and to live to a thing or person is to be wholly given up to them; to have the most intimate connection with them. (Dr. Adam Clarke)
When it is said, therefore, that a Christian is dead to sin, the sense is, that it has lost its influence ever him; he is not subject to it; he is in regard to that, as the man in the grave is to the busy scenes and cares of this life. (Dr. Albert Barnes)
May it never be! How shall we who died to sin still live in it? (NASB)
God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? (KJV)
Of course not! Since we have died to sin, how can we continue to live in it? (NLT)
Absolutely not! How can we who died to sin still live in it? (NET)

If we take a step back and look at the whole of chapter 6, we will discover the illustration here used is that of slavery.  We are the slave and Sin is the master.  If it had been left up to me to create a solution to the sin problem, then I would have done away with sin (the master).  However, here we see that Christ's plan was to do away with the sinner!  As the Apostle later elaborates, we are dead.  The problem ensues when I take my pulse and discover that my body is still very much alive.  It is in Christ that we are dead to sin and its power.  The fact that we have been brought to the foot of the Cross should remind us that we have had enough of this slavery to sin and all of its consequences.  But now we must enter into the experiential realm of putting off the old man and putting on the new man (in Christ).  Or put in theological terms: Sanctification (being made holy) consists of: Mortification (dying to sin) and Vivification (living to righteousness).

You have had enough in the past of the evil things that godless people enjoy—their immorality and lust, their feasting and drunkenness and wild parties, and their terrible worship of idols. (1 Peter 4:3 NLT)
The apostle is very full in pressing the necessity of holiness. He does not explain away the free grace of the gospel, but he shows that connection between justification and holiness are inseparable. Let the thought be abhorred, of continuing in sin that grace may abound. True believers are dead to sin, therefore they ought not to follow it. No man can at the same time be both dead and alive. He is a fool who, desiring to be dead unto sin, thinks he may live in it. (Matthew Henry)
Rom 6:2 God forbid. (2) How shall we, that are (b) dead to sin, live any longer therein?

(2) The benefits of justification and sanctification are always inseparable joined together, and both of them proceed from Christ by the grace of God: now sanctification is the abolishing of sin, that is, of our natural corruption, whose place is taken by the cleanness and pureness of a reformed nature.

(b) They are said by Paul to be dead to sin, who are made partakers of the power of Christ, so that the natural corruption is dead in them, that is, the power of it is removed, and it does not bring forth its bitter fruits: and on the other hand, they are said to live to sin, who are in the flesh, that is, whom the Spirit of God has not delivered from the slavery of the corruption of nature. (Geneva Bible Translation Notes)
 

 

 

How shall we, that are dead to sin - The phraseology of this verse is common among Hebrews, Greeks, and Latins.  To Die to a thing or person, is to have nothing to do with it or him; to be totally separated from them: and to live to a thing or person is to be wholly given up to them; to have the most intimate connection with them. (Dr. Adam Clarke)
When it is said, therefore, that a Christian is dead to sin, the sense is, that it has lost its influence ever him; he is not subject to it; he is in regard to that, as the man in the grave is to the busy scenes and cares of this life. (Dr. Albert Barnes)
May it never be! How shall we who died to sin still live in it? (NASB)
God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein? (KJV)
Of course not! Since we have died to sin, how can we continue to live in it? (NLT)
Absolutely not! How can we who died to sin still live in it? (NET)

If we take a step back and look at the whole of chapter 6, we will discover the illustration here used is that of slavery.  We are the slave and Sin is the master.  If it had been left up to me to create a solution to the sin problem, then I would have done away with sin (the master).  However, here we see that Christ's plan was to do away with the sinner!  As the Apostle later elaborates, we are dead.  The problem ensues when I take my pulse and discover that my body is still very much alive.  It is in Christ that we are dead to sin and its power.  The fact that we have been brought to the foot of the Cross should remind us that we have had enough of this slavery to sin and all of its consequences.  But now we must enter into the experiential realm of putting off the old man and putting on the new man (in Christ).  Or put in theological terms: Sanctification (being made holy) consists of: Mortification (dying to sin) and Vivification (living to righteousness).

You have had enough in the past of the evil things that godless people enjoy—their immorality and lust, their feasting and drunkenness and wild parties, and their terrible worship of idols. (1 Peter 4:3 NLT)
The apostle is very full in pressing the necessity of holiness. He does not explain away the free grace of the gospel, but he shows that connection between justification and holiness are inseparable. Let the thought be abhorred, of continuing in sin that grace may abound. True believers are dead to sin, therefore they ought not to follow it. No man can at the same time be both dead and alive. He is a fool who, desiring to be dead unto sin, thinks he may live in it. (Matthew Henry)
Rom 6:2 God forbid. (2) How shall we, that are (b) dead to sin, live any longer therein?

(2) The benefits of justification and sanctification are always inseparable joined together, and both of them proceed from Christ by the grace of God: now sanctification is the abolishing of sin, that is, of our natural corruption, whose place is taken by the cleanness and pureness of a reformed nature.

(b) They are said by Paul to be dead to sin, who are made partakers of the power of Christ, so that the natural corruption is dead in them, that is, the power of it is removed, and it does not bring forth its bitter fruits: and on the other hand, they are said to live to sin, who are in the flesh, that is, whom the Spirit of God has not delivered from the slavery of the corruption of nature. (Geneva Bible Translation Notes)
 

 

 



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